Social Speech and Supreme Court


Supreme Court will be flooded with social media cases that violate the first amendment. Gus Hurwitz covers the two that were in the news last weekend. In the FirstJustice Barrett spoke on behalf of a unanimous court when he outlined the fact-based rules that determine whether a public official can use a platform’s features to suppress critics who post on their social media pages.  Gus and i agree that this could lead to a lot more litigation unless public officials take the Court’s broad hint and follow it: If you do not want your page treated as official, just say that up front.

As we recorded the case, the second social-media case making headlines was being argued. Murthy v. Missouri The US government pressed social media companies to remove posts it disagreed with.  The Court was clearly struggling with a number of justiciability questions and a factual history that the government vigorously challenged. If the Court reaches a decision on the merits, they will likely address when encouraging the suppression or a particular speech becomes coerced.

Gus and Jeffrey Atik review the week’s biggest news – the House has passed a bill to force the divestment of TikTok, despite the outcry of millions of influencers.  The Senate is yet to decide whether it will follow suit. Deeply Uncertain.

Melanie Teplinsky reports that data on American driving habits has been released. Sending out a message Insurance companies to adjust their rates.

Melanie also describes FCC’s brand new Cyber Trust Mark for IOT devices.  Our commentators also agree with the Commission.

Gus brings us back to the contest territory: What should be done? How to create fake images using technology Fake pictures of a naked woman. We also discuss a UK discussion about A short audio clip Many believe that this is a fake intended to embarrass an English Labour politician.

Gus gives us the latest information from the SVR’s compromising of a Microsoft network. This leads to a meditation about the unintended consequence of the SEC’s newly mandated cyber incident reporting requirements.

Jeffrey explains how the bitter conflict between app store sales and iTunes has escalated.  Apple and Epic games

Melanie outlines A possible solution Water systems are not protected by cybersecurity standards. It’s It’s too soon to tell if it will be adopted.

Melanie tells us also why  JetBrains Rapid7 and Rapid7 have been fighting about “silent patches.”

Gus and I finally dig into Meta’s High-stakes fight The FTC and the Rough reception It got from a DC District court.

Supreme Court will be flooded with social media cases that violate the first amendment. Gus Hurwitz covers the two cases that were in the news last weekend. In the FirstJustice Barrett spoke on behalf of a unanimous court when he outlined the fact-based rules that determine whether a public official can use a platform’s features to suppress critics who post on their social media pages.  Gus and i agree that this could lead to a lot more litigation unless public officials take the Court’s broad hint and follow it: If you do not want your page treated as official, just say that up front.

As we recorded the case, we heard the second social-media case making headlines. Murthy v. Missouri The US government is being pressured by social media to remove posts it does not agree with.  The Court struggled with a variety of justiciability concerns and a record of facts that the Government vigorously challenged. If the Court reaches a decision on the merits, they will likely address when encouraging the suppression or a particular speech becomes coerced.

Gus and Jeffrey Atik review the week’s biggest news – the House has passed a bill to force the divestment of TikTok, despite the outcry of millions of influencers.  The Senate is yet to decide whether it will follow suit. Deeply Uncertain.

Melanie Teplinsky reports that data on American driving habits has been released. . Insurance companies to adjust their rates.

Melanie also describes FCC’s brand new Cyber Trust Mark for IOT devices.  Our commentators also agree with the Commission.

Gus brings us back to the contest territory: What should be done? How to create fake images using technology Pictures of naked women. We also discuss a UK discussion about A short audio clip Many believe that this is a fake intended to embarrass an English Labour politician.

Gus gives us the latest information from the SVR’s compromise. Microsoft network. This leads to a meditation about the unintended consequence of the SEC’s newly mandated cyber incident reporting requirements.

Jeffrey explains how the bitter conflict between app store sales and iTunes has escalated.  Apple and Epic games

Melanie outlines A possible solution Water systems are not protected by cybersecurity standards. It’s It’s too soon to tell if it will be adopted.

Melanie tells us also why  JetBrains Rapid7 and Rapid7 are fighting over “silent patching.”

Gus and I finally dig into Meta’s High-stakes fight The FTC and the ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? It got from a DC district Court.

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